Dec 142018
 

English

[French translation below]

Research centres and groups CERMAA, ICONEA and IReMus are delighted to inform you that the main theme for number eight of NEMO-Online will be: Music as science or music as art? This question has brought up controversy for centuries. It seems useful to apprehend what is the current position of music and musicology about this conundrum.

Other themes are also proposed:

  1. The concepts and terminology of musicology and their evolution
    1. Variations on the linguistics of musicology. Have homophonic terms in various languages and different cultures the same meaning ?
      • Collation of a multilingual lexicon taking these linguistic variations into account.
    2. Differing perceptions in different times and spaces for terms such as ‘heterophony’, ‘polyphony’, ‘monody’, or ‘diatonic’, ‘chromatic’, ‘enharmonic’, etc.?
    3. Difference between ‘law’ and ‘rule’
    4. Others
  2. Musicology in the Arabian World aside countries having an established musicological structure such as the Lebanon and Tunisia.
    1. ‎Music and musicology in the Maghrib, countries of the Persian Gulf, Syria.
    2. ‎‎Byzantine and related chanting, such as syriac, coptic, etc.
    3. Others
  3. Common practice of maqām
    1. The Mediterranean and the Balkans
    2. Turkic and Persian worlds
    3. Indian, Chinese and others
    4. Beyond the Western Mediterranean

Articles for this issue will be published according to their evaluation and layout for the internet. NEMO-Online No. 8 will collate articles published and in the course of editing and will be printed in November 2020 as part of the fifth volume (NEMO-Online Nos. 8 & 9).

Languages an rules : click here.
Please send proposals for articles to Richard Dumbrill (rdumbrill[[[]]]nemo-online.org) and Amine Beyhom (amine.beyhom[[[]]]nemo-online.org) before end of May 2019.

Deadline for papers: end of July 2019.

Additionally, the Editorial Board will consider special extraneous contributions as long as they fit within the general aim of the publication.

Previous volumes are available here. (Please note that Volume 4, Nos 6&7 is now available in print.) Individual papers are available from the Articles tab on the NEMO-Online site.

 

French

Les centres et groupes de recherches CERMAA, ICONEA et IReMus ont le plaisir d’annoncer le thème principal du no 8 de NEMO-Online : Musique en tant que science ou musique en tant qu’art ? Cette question soulève la controverse depuis des millénaires, et il semblerait utile de faire un état des lieux de la pensée musicologique et musicale à ce sujet.

D’autres thèmes sont proposés, sur le long terme, à partir de ce numéro et continueront de complémenter le thème principal :

  1. Les concepts et la terminologie de la musicologie et leur évolution historique :
    1. Variations linguistiques de la terminologie (les « mêmes » termes veulent-ils dire la même chose dans différentes langues ou différentes cultures ?)
      • Établissement d’un lexique multilingue et/ou d’un dictionnaire critique de la musicologie prenant en compte ces variations
    2. Perceptions différentes dans le temps et l’espace de termes comme « hétérophonie », « polyphonie », « monodie », ou encore « diatonique », « chromatique », « enharmonique », etc. ?
    3. La différence entre « loi » et « règle » dans différentes langues et à différentes époques
    4. Autres
  2. Musicologie du Monde Arabe hors pays ayant des structures établies en musicologie (tels le Liban et la Tunisie) :‎
    1. ‎Musique et musicologie du Maghreb, des pays du Golfe arabo-persique, de la Syrie
    2. ‎Chant byzantin et dérivés, chant syriaque, chant copte, etc.‎
    3. Autres
  3. Tronc commun du maqām:
    1. Méditerranée et Balkans
    2. Mondes turcique et persan
    3. Affinités indiennes, chinoises ou autres
    4. Au-delà de la Méditerranée européenne

Les articles de ce numéro seront publiés au fur et à mesure de leur réception-évaluation-préparation pour la publication internet. NEMO-Online No 8 rassemblera les articles parus et en cours de parution et sera publié en novembre 2020, comme partie du Volume 5 (NEMO-Online Nos 8 & 9).

Langues et normes : voir ici.
Envoi des propositions d’articles à Richard Dumbrill (rdumbrill[[[]]]nemo-online.org) et Amine Beyhom (amine.beyhom[[[]]]nemo-online.org) avant : fin mai 2019.

Date limite d’envoi des articles : fin juillet 2019.

La rédaction acceptera également d’examiner des dossiers spéciaux ou des articles hors-thème, du moment qu’ils concernent la thématique générale de la revue.

Les volumes précédents sont disponibles ici, les articles individuels dans l’onglet Articles sur le site de NEMO-Online. Veuillez noter que le Volume 4, Nos 6&7 est désormais disponible en version imprimée.

 

Nov 092017
 

English

Free download of the articles of Nemo-Online Vol. 4 No. 6 below (click for the pdf version on the corresponding title of each article). 

Issue 6 of NEMO-Online and editorial will be available in hard copy and pdf with Issue 7 in Volume 4, November 2018.

NEMO-Online Vol. 4 Nos. 6 & 7 call for papers was: Research groups CERMAA, ICONEA and IReMus are seeking papers for the sixth and seventh issues of NEMO. The theme, continued from the theme of NEMO-Online No. 5 (available here), is about ‘Musicology/Ethnomusicology: evolutions, problems, alternatives’.

This call for papers is sustained for NEMO-Online Vol. 4 No. 7 issue. We would like this issue of NEMO to continue the debate initiated in NEMO-Online No. 5&6 concerning the usefulness of the science, the problems raised due to powerful and contradictory non-scientific characteristics, and the alternatives which may be proposed.

Papers to be sent both to Richard Dumbrill (rdumbrill[[[]]]nemo-online.org) and Amine Beyhom (abeyhom[[[]]]nemo-online.org) and should follow the editorial layout.

Following the updated editorial policy of NEMO-Online, papers are published as soon as ready during the year preceding the official publication in November of each year, then emendated if necessary for final publication. Papers hold the date of their effective publication besides the date of their official publication (between parentheses). To comply with NEMO-Online publishing policy, and as with all articles of the review since Volume 3, the pdf version includes bookmarks corresponding to the titles, sub-titles, tables and figures, which should help the reader navigate between the different parts of the article.

The Editing Board will consider the publication of papers which might be ‘off subject’ as long as they retain some relationship with the wider theme of the publication.

Deadlines for NEMO-Online No. 7 issue: proposals by end of May 2018 and finalized paper by end of July 2018.

Previous volumes available here, individual articles on the dedicated page (Articles tab) on NEMO-Online website.

 

NEMO-Online 6 contents :

Musicology/Ethnomusicology: evolutions, problems, alternatives (2)

Originally entitled  “A New Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales and their Origins” and published (2010) in the proceedings of ICONEA 2008, this paper has been emendated, updated and enriched, and is reissued for NEMO-Online Vol. 4 No. 6. New research since its first publication presented complementary and sometimes clarifying facts which, with the evolution of terminology (see Beyhom’s “Lexicon” in NEMO-Online Vol. 2 No. 2 – in French, with Appendix L entitled “Core Glossary” – in this article complementing it), makes it indispensable to publish this new edition. Most of the tables and figures have been reintegrated in the body text, and a dedicated appendix (Appendix G) has been added concerning Octavial scales with limited transposition.

(Adapted) excerpts from the article (Introduction):

The insistence of Mainstream Western Archaeomusicology at force-fitting the Babylonian musical system into the Western model is one of the greatest oversights in the History of music. It came from the methodology (or rather of its absence) of certain Assyriologists and of their determination at spearheading “their discoveries” by means of unsuitable Western models. The manner in which Musical systems are constructed, whether consciously or not, are part of the culture of a people and must be unveiled with the utmost respect and without linkage to theories of later cultures as this would lead to colonialist unification. This article is the consequence of my determined endeavor at academically fostering the proof of the evidence against unproven presumptive inference, and more significantly to assert, scientifically, that heptatonism – which is not universal – is by no means engraved onto mankind’s unconscious. It is a structure, among others, which eventually hatched in the Near-East, as part and consequence of another or other systems, but not as a new, independent and exclusive concept.

Bruno Chikushin (his artist name) Deschênes, a musician and author of a book on the shakuhashi, is a trained shakuhachi player. The aim of his article is to propose a musician’s point of view on the analysis of the honkyoku repertoire. In order to propose another model for understanding this unique music, Deschênes expands on previous authors’ proposals and shows, in the final section, that some of these authors’ conclusions do apply to honkyoku music, while others do not. Although these authors present a relevant understanding of the melodic structure of honkyoku, Deschênes suggests that there is more to it than they propose, specifically highlighting two important aspects of this music that they miss, namely that playing shakuhachi has to do first and foremost with tone-color, not pitches, and that the melodic quality of each phrase and each piece is more in the melodic forms and contours created by the kakuontei and the kakuon than it is in the pitches (see the Glossary at the end of the article).

 

Français

Les articles du numéro 6 de NEMO-Online sont accessibles librement en téléchargement ci-dessous (cliquer sur les titres des articles pour télécharger les pdf).

Le numéro 6 et l’éditorial seront publiés, en version papier et pdf, conjointement avec le Numéro 7 au sein du Volume 4 en (novembre) 2018.

L’appel à contributions pour NEMO-Online Volume 4 nos 6 & 7 était:

Les centres et groupes de recherches CERMAA, ICONEA et IReMus ont le plaisir d’annoncer le thème du Volume 4 de NEMO-Online, nos 6 & 7 : « Musicologies/Ethnomusicologies : évolutions, problèmes, alternatives ». Le thème est la continuation du thème de NEMO-Online no 5, que vous pouvez revoir ici.

Cet appel est maintenu pour NEMO-Online n°7. Nous souhaitons à NEMO que ce numéro prolonge le débat sur l’utilité de la discipline, sur les problèmes suscités par ses caractéristiques fortement (et contradictoirement) a-scientifiques, et, surtout, sur les alternatives qui peuvent être proposées.

Les articles de ce numéro seront publiés au fur et à mesure de leur réception-évaluation-préparation pour la publication internet. NEMO-Online No 7 rassemblera les articles parus et en cours de parution et sera publié en novembre 2018, comme partie du Volume 4 (NEMO-Online Nos 6 & 7).

Langues et normes : voir ici.
Envoi des propositions d’articles à Richard Dumbrill (rdumbrill[[[]]]nemo-online.org) et Amine Beyhom (abeyhom[[[]]]nemo-online.org) avant : fin mai 2018 pour NEMO-Online No 7.

Date limite d’envoi des articles : fin juillet 2018 pour NEMO-Online No 7.

La rédaction acceptera également d’examiner des dossiers spéciaux ou des articles hors-thème, du moment qu’ils concernent la thématique générale de la revue.

Les volumes précédents sont disponibles ici, les articles individuels dans l’onglet Articles récemment ajouté sur le site de NEMO-Online.

Contenu du numéro 6 :

Musicologie/Ethnomusicologie: evolutions, problèmes, alternatives (2)

Le titre original de cet article, publié en 2010 après le colloque ICONEA 2008, était “A New Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales and their Origins”. Cette version publiée par NEMO-Online porte le titre, plus concis, “A Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales”, l’hypothèse présentée n’étant pas nouvelle (établie en 2003) et toujours non remise en cause dans la littérature musicologique. L’article est corrigé, mis à jour pour la terminologie (voir le “Lexique” de l’auteur dans NEMO-Online Vol. 2 No. 2, avec l’Appendice L – le “Core Glossary” – dans cet article comme complément), et augmenté.  La plupart des tables et figures a été réintégrée dans le texte principal, et l’Appendice G (concernant les échelles à transposition limitée) ajouté, avec son complément Power Point. 

Extraits (adaptés) de l’article (Introduction):

L’acharnement avec lequel la musicologie occidentale a essayé de refondre le système babylonien dans un moule occidental, ne lui convenant pas, est certainement l’expression d’un occicentrisme persistant issu d’une méthodologie, ou plutôt de son absence, parmi les assyriologues et pseudos-musicologues, et de leur acharnement à promouvoir leurs ‘découvertes’ par le moyen de modèles occidentaux inappropriés. La manière dont les systèmes musicaux sont construits, consciemment ou non, fait partie de la culture d’un groupe ‘ethnique’ et doit être dévoilée avec le plus grand respect et sans, à tout prix, les rattacher à des cultures qui leurs sont postérieures car cela équivaudrait à une unification colonialiste. Cet article est la conséquence de ma détermination à produire la preuve des faits contre les présomptions issues d’interprétations, et plus particulièrement de démontrer que l’heptatonisme – qui n’est pas universel – n’est certainement pas gravé dans notre inconscient. C’est une structure, entre d’autres, qui éventuellement eût éclos au Proche-Orient comme partie et comme la conséquence d’un autre ou d’autres systèmes, mais non un système nouveau, indépendant et exclusif.

Bruno Chikushin (de son nom d’artiste japonais) Deschênes, auteur du premier livre en français consacré au shakuhachi, est un musicien de formation. Le but de son article est de proposer une analyse du répertoire solo de honkyoku pour shakuhachi du point de vue du musicien. Afin de proposer un modèle qui devrait permetre de mieux comprendre cette musique unique, Deschênes développe les propositions d’auteurs précédents et montre, dans la dernière section, que certaines conclusions de ces auteurs s’appliquent à la musique honkyoku, alors que d’autres ne s’appliquent pas. Bien que ces auteurs présentent une compréhension pertinente de la structure mélodique de honkyoku, Deschênes suggère qu’il y a plus que ce que leurs analayses proposent, soulignant spécifiquement deux aspects importants de cette musique qui sont absents, à savoir que le jeu du shakuhachi consiste d’abord à mettre de l’avant les timbres musicaux et non les hauteurs, et que la qualité mélodique de chaque phrase et de chaque pièce est plus dans les formes mélodiques et les contours créés par les kakuontei (intervalle nucélaire) et les kakuon (note nucléaire) que dans les hauteurs proprement dites (voir aussi le glossaire à la fin de l’article).

 

(Permalink: http://nemo-online.org/archives/1692)